Tag Archives: Microscale

Some say “Go big or go home!” but it takes real talent to compress something down to just a few studs and still keep it recognizable. Of course, many of the micro models we feature here aren’t so small after all, whether it’s a vast cityscape or starship.

Shakespeare’s Globe Theater in Microscale

The Globe Theater is iconic, with a long rich history. Artisan Bricks has recreated the theater in microscale, complete with removable roof for easy stage access.

This tiny theater features the iconic round shape, with the open arena for the audience. There are balconies all around, with the elevated stage.

I have you now!

The Brothers Brick have covered Star Wars builds of all shapes and sizes, but rarely one that would fit in the palm of your hand. This microscale LEGO trench scene from Star Wars: A New Hope by Grantmasters is simultaneously adorable and clever, especially the 6-brick X-wing fighter featuring a unicorn horn. The force is definitely strong with this one!

For more microscale recreations of scenes from classic Sci-Fi movies and TV shows, be sure to check out the Mi-Fi group on Flickr.

Micro LEGO National Park: Meridian Hill, Washington DC

National parks come in all shapes and sizes, though I don’t think extra tiny is on the list! jsnyder002 has given us this beautiful micro rendition of Meridian Hill National Park, located in Washington, DC. The real park certainly sits on the smaller side of things, and was formerly a garden for a a mansion.

The micro LEGO version features beautiful waterfalls and glorious arches, and is quite an accurate rendition of the real thing.

It’s a fitting tribute for the National Park centennial this year!

How to construct the Avalonian Countryside trees

Sometimes it is easy to see how a builder created a particular LEGO build, while at other times a build requires a bit of breakdown and perhaps even a tutorial if there are ‘hidden’ techniques. Last week we blogged this fantastic microscale LEGO countryside diorama from Full Plate, with beautiful fall foliage and crops ready for harvest.

Avalonian Countryside (9 of 9)

The builder, Emil Lidé, has responded to questions about the creation of his trees with this fantastic tutorial to help you create your own. First, he starts with a layout of the parts required for the green trees.

Microscale Tree Mini-tutorial (1 of 5)

Next, Emil shows how the trunk is built using a six-pronged flower stem to ‘hang’ the main foliage. The foliage in this example uses a mix of 1×2 plates and 2×2 round plates.

Continue reading

Little monster walks tall

We’ve seen many brick-built LEGO Godzillas over the years, but this one by SPARKART! may be the smallest. Despite its size, it still manages to convey the feeling of a towering creature of destruction. All it needs now is a microscale city to destroy.

Leg Godt Zilla

One final point to note here is that the colour composition of this picture makes the grey bricks look almost blue. For a second I thought we might be getting the ubiquitous Mixel joints in some new colours, but sadly my hopes were to be dashed!

Waiting for fall in the Avalonian countryside

Fall is right around the corner, and in some places, has completely arrived and settled in. I’d wager that’s the case for this beautiful micro LEGO countryside diorama from Full Plate, with the beautiful fall foliage and the crops ready for harvest.

There’s quite a bit of detail here; the cottages are adorable and simple, and highly effective. the trees are bursting with color and you can clearly identify the different kinds. The dock into the pond is a nice touch.

Avalonian Countryside (9 of 9)

Avalonian Countryside (6 of 9)

The school year has started at microscale LEGO Hogwarts Castle

You’re a bit late, but given that we’ve just discovered this tiny Hogwarts Castle, I believe you’ll be able to start the term without issue.

Kit Bricksto build this beautiful micro-scale Hogwarts and it’s just adorable. It’s very recognizable, with the greenhouses and great hall, and that lovely courtyard (no word if this is before or after book 7).

Lego Architecture: Hogwarts Castle

A tiny but amazing LEGO fortress — and how it’s built [Video]

Grant Davis has built this spectacular little microscale castle. Like most LEGO microscale creations, it’s awash in terrific creativity, with lots of unusual pieces used in new ways, and the finished product belies its complexity. Fortunately for all of us curious viewers, Grant made a short video that shows some of the techniques he employed as he walks us through the disassembly of the model.

Mycrow Cassul

Supersized LEGO Architecture 21028 New York City skyline

One of my favorite LEGO Architecture sets of the last few years have been the city skyline series, including 21028 New York City. LEGO architect Spencer_R specializes in 1/650 scale models of landmarks, including numerous skyscrapers. Spencer says he’d already built several of the buildings in the set, so he built the Flatiron building and Statue of Liberty, and then put all of them on a large black base. This much larger scale enables Spencer to include much more detail than the minuscule buildings in the official set, and the higher-resolution photo on Flickr — as well as Spencer’s photostream as a whole — is well worth a closer look.

LEGO Architecture New York City: Super Sized

Microscale bridge is anything but the wurst

“All the specialized parts have taken the creativity out of LEGO building…” If you know someone who regularly trots out this sort of baloney then just show them this model. In one of the finest pieces of creative parts usage I’ve seen all year, this microscale Golden Gate Bridge by liqsr uses hot dog sausages as suspension cables. That’s right, hot dog sausages — possibly the single most “specialized” part LEGO has ever produced. I’m now trying to come up with more sausage-related puns, but none of them quite cut the mustard. Just look at the bridge and be amazed instead…

Micro Golden Gate Bridge

Through the Siq to the hidden Nabatean city of Petra

As I wrote in introducing ArzLan’s LEGO Petra, I spent the summer of 1994 on an archaeological dig in Jordan, and visited Petra for one memorable weekend. Both Petra and Jordan as a whole remain one of the highlights of my life. Legranger Absurde has built a lovely microscale version of Al-Khazneh, the “Treasury” (actually an empty tomb), that greets each visitor to Petra as they emerge from the winding gorge called the Siq.

Petra

My one critique of this excellent LEGO model is that the sandstone geology of Petra is nearly as spectacular as the many structures carved into the rock face. Although building a detailed tomb using varying shades of tan and red might not have been achievable, plain brown LEGO for the surrounding rocks seems like a lost opportunity.

Al-Khazneh is, of course best known as the entrance to the fictional, trap-filled obstacle course leading to the Holy Grail in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. The facade is the most spectacular thing about the tomb — the interior is just an empty square chamber, though the acoustics are great for singing.