Tag Archives: Hugo

Danger in the Shadows

From the early days of the Empire comes Hugo‘s LEGO creation of what truly can be described as “dark times.” Here, two Imperial clone troopers patrol a run-down street while dangers lurk in the shadows. This whole creation looks dirty, and that’s probably just the way Hugo wanted it. From the different shades of grey, brown and tan, the colors flow together to show the grit of the Star Wars universe, as well as the same colors that are shoved into the crevices of the building. Each brick looks like it naturally exists there. I also really like the use of red capes as the awnings on the walls. That’s a technique we don’t see often enough.

Dark Times RPG Target VII - The hidden blade (Ord Mantell)

The best part about this build is that it fills me with questions: what will happen next? Will the dark Duro figure get the jump on the troopers? Or will the Imperial assassin on the upper level strike first?

Harry and Draco duel it out as stars of the show

When it comes to creations shared on The Brothers Brick, it may seem like the brick-built models are the stars of the show while minifigures stand in as accessories. This is not always the case, though. For example, in Hugo’s model of Draco Malfoy casting Serpensortia, the architecture acts as a frame or backdrop while the minifigures take center stage.

Serpensortia-1

Don’t get me wrong, this backdrop is built amazingly well – from the stained glass window, to the arch over the window, and the mixed brickwork – but I’m a sucker for well-integrated minifigures. While there are some stock characters mixed in, such as Filch, Snape, Draco and Harry, my favourites are the other characters that fill out the scene. There’s a subtle art to choosing the right facial expressions and hair pieces to bring a character to life, and then you need to position them in a dynamic way to ensure they’re reacting appropriately and not all standing parallel or perpendicular to each other. Hugo has nailed all of that in this scene. The full range of expected emotions is visible, with characters upset, scared, or angry depending on their house. Yet this ignores the most cleverly placed minifigure of them all…the one that’s included in the building itself as a moving painting.