A not-quite standard “Standard”

The Gibson Les Paul was one of the first mass-produced solid-body electric guitars. There are a lot of versions and editions, but this is the first time I’ve seen one made out of LEGO, at least at a 1:1 scale. Builder morimorilego has paid close attention to realism in this reproduction of the “Les Paul Standard”. The body is decked out in layers of red, orange, and yellow tile and brick, with the pickguard standing out in vibrant white. Golden dishes and transparent yellow 2×2 round brick are used for the control knobs, and the output jack is courtesy of a system wheel rim. Those details complement the work done in the neck and headstock, which help make this build feel like it’s ready to play.

Gibson "Les Paul Standard"

The headstock has just the right shaping thanks to a variety of cheese slopes. The tuning keys make use of Technic pins and 2×2 round plate, but I’m not sure those strings are LEGO elements. 1×1 upright clip plates keep them aligned nicely, and 1×6 tiles for the frets are just the right choice.

Gibson "Les Paul Standard"

Looking at the back of the headstock, you can see more Technic construction to mimic the real-world shaping. The tuning keys might not adjust the string tension in reality, but they sure look like they would really like to. The use of curved slopes makes the back of the neck look solid and functional, too.

Gibson "Les Paul Standard"

We’ll finish off with a peek at what lies behind this build. The exposed undersides of LEGO plates reveal the construction techniques a bit. Seeing a bit of the LEGO source is a nice touch here, considering there are almost no studs showing on the rest of the body. From a distance, I think you’d still have to look twice to pick this one out of a lineup of real guitars.

Gibson "Les Paul Standard"

If you’re wanting even more brick-built musical goodness, check out our look at another 1:1 scale classic guitar. It’s a jam session just waiting to happen!

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