Tag Archives: 1:1 scale

A not-quite standard “Standard”

The Gibson Les Paul was one of the first mass-produced solid-body electric guitars. There are a lot of versions and editions, but this is the first time I’ve seen one made out of LEGO, at least at a 1:1 scale. Builder morimorilego has paid close attention to realism in this reproduction of the “Les Paul Standard”. The body is decked out in layers of red, orange, and yellow tile and brick, with the pickguard standing out in vibrant white. Golden dishes and transparent yellow 2×2 round brick are used for the control knobs, and the output jack is courtesy of a system wheel rim. Those details complement the work done in the neck and headstock, which help make this build feel like it’s ready to play.

Gibson "Les Paul Standard"

Click for a closer look

Oh, shoot!

The Fujifilm X100 Series is an iconic camera line, and builder John Huang has given it an equally iconic LEGO treatment. Curved slope tiles in grey and black give the housing clean edges and lines. A minifigure frying pan makes a great stand-in for the viewfinder selector switch, and a Technic gear forms the shutter speed dial.

The Fujifilm X100 Series

As nice as those details are, the viewfinder on this one is really a cut above. It’s also cool to see the lens housing rotated and sitting at a tilted angle; it makes this feel even more like a functional piece of camera equipment. I’m just loving all these 1:1 scale LEGO cameras lately, but this one makes me particularly happy.

The Fujifilm X100 Series

LEGO shows off a real Ducati Panigale V4 R motorcycle with Technic exterior [News]

LEGO has unveiled a brief video and photos of a real Ducati Panigale V4 R motorcycle with a Technic exterior. The hybrid model is meant to celebrate the European launch of the 42107 Technic Ducati Panigale V4 R. The motorcycle’s exterior was created by LEGO Certified Professional Riccardo Zangelmi, who had never built with Technic elements professionally before this project. The final model weighs 400 pounds (180 kg) including the motorcycle innards, is composed of 15,000 bricks, and took 400 hours to build. Unlike other life-size models, this LEGO Ducati exterior has no glue and was created by hand and not using 3D modeling software.

42107 Technic Ducati Panigale V4 R currently retails for 54.99 GBP and will sell for $69.99 USD99.99 CAD when it launches in the Americas on August 1st. (Editor’s note: The press release below states that the set will cost $59.99 USD but we have independently verified with LEGO that the price will actually be $69.99 USD which is consistent with the price displayed on the LEGO Store Online.)

See more photos and video of the life-size LEGO Technic Ducati Panigale V4 R motorcycle

Forget Murder Hornets. Here come the Penguins.

I’ll admit I’ve always been a bit of a pessimist. 2020 hasn’t exactly done much to curb that point of view. And maybe I’m just being alarmist. But it sure feels like MSIndustries creating weaponry for penguins is a bad idea. Oh, sure, from a LEGO standpoint this is a great thing. The “Penguin Ice Pistol” is sized perfectly for a flipper, and has great retro sci-fi styling. The “Penguin Communicator” has a great cheese-slope mosaic display and some unusual part usage including Brickheadz glasses and a push bumper. And that pouch of fish may be just a display piece (considering the parts aren’t actually connected) but it’s clever and packed full of protein.

Field Gear

So I’ll try and be optimistic about things. Maybe it’ll be a good thing to welcome our new Penguin Overlords. And if not, well, their weapons are made of LEGO so they’ll be easy to take apart, at least.

LEGO Technic pendulum clock that can run accurately for more than a year

I came across this interesting YouTube video by Dillon Sharlet that showcases a pendulum clock that’s been running for more than a year, and more recently, it’s starting to stop unexpectedly. He documents this video to tear apart his build to investigate which parts have worn out over time, but before that, gives a brief description of how it works and a closer look at the clock escapement design and mechanism.

Click here to read more…

She brings grumpiness to life

Builder Felix Jaensch has constructed a life-sized LEGO figure he calls “Grumpy Girl”. He tells us “she is in a huff at the moment” but offers no other explanation for her dour demeanor. Maybe she’s cold? Annoyed? Maybe she’s in a huff at the condition of the world today? Maybe she just doesn’t want to turn that frown upside-down right now. Who knows, this piece poses more questions than answers. But there is no denying the skill needed to bring this grumpy young lady to life.

Grumpy Girl

This shot offers up clear details, her lips in a pout, her well-sculpted nose, and even her zipper on her hoodie are all amazing details. She’s seen some things in her day and she’s a bit peeved by it, and that’s OK. While her expression may be dour, she still puts a smile on my face, even for just a little while.

Grumpy Girl

Here are plenty of other times Felix’s life-like work has made us smile.

Play(mobil) well?

Once, long long ago, I nearly got fired from my job at Toys R Us. Someone had called in asking if we had Playmobil sets. I thought they meant LEGO. My TRU did not stock Playmobil. When they got to the store, they were NOT happy. I have since learned my lesson. Playmobil is a very different toy line. And then Miro Dudas comes along and makes me question everything all over again. Dangit.

Artist’s Corner

Built as an entry for the Iron Forge contest, this masterful bit of deception uses the minfigure wrench as a key piece. That part creates the distinctive shape of the figure’s hands, as well as appearing as the hands of the clock. You also have to appreciate the 1:1 scale artist tools. I particularly like the use of the 4×4 round plate with hole to form the rim of the open paint jar. I also like the compass – the use of a minifig rapier for the pointy end is pretty neat.

It’s a very nice creation. Even if it does make my head hurt a little.

LEGO photography in monochrome

LEGO and photography are core interests of most of the Brothers Brick staff – and when they combine we take notice. There’s been a recent trend of super-realistic LEGO camera recreations and today we’re sharing another stellar example. This Olympus OM-1 by David Hensel is just a joy to behold. Built for a contest where only one color was allowed, this monochromatic marvel is full of unusual parts and smart techniques. My favorite feature is the tank treads that form lens housing. Using a 4×4 dome as the lens itself is also unusual for these builds, but it adds just the right curvature to the product shot here. Other standout touches are the ribbed 1×2 brick in the case, the minifigure life preservers as cord straps, and the variety of tires that form the knobs.

Olympus OM-1

You know you’ve nailed the appearance when you still have to take a second look when your model is grouped in with some examples of the actual camera.

Olympus OM-1

I suppose over time this theme could even branch out into more smartphone builds. I’m guilty of using mine for most of my photos these days. Regardless, here’s to hoping that this isn’t the last camera we see, either from David or other builders.

A twist on deepfake images

More and more these days, I worry about the truth of what I see online. From deepfakes to bot accounts, it feels like nothing can really be trusted anymore. And then…and then…people like Joe Klang make me start doubting reality itself. I mean, look at this Leica M camera. Except it’s not a camera at all, is it? Of course not. It’s made out of LEGO bricks.

It’s the creative part usage that makes this model so realistic. Minifigure weapons connect a length of chain serving as a perfect camera strap, with small rubber tires cinching things up nicely. An X-Pod lid doubles as a lens cap, and a variety of 1×1 tiles mimic the camera housing with just the right level of texture.

My version of a Leica M camera. Rebuild in LEGO

At least I know I can take a break from this madness and go and play some classic Atari games. (Or maybe not…)

The pitfalls of realistic building

There’s a danger to building realistic LEGO creations in that there is a chance writers like us could pass it up. While seeking out inspiration for articles, my thought process went as follows, LEGO build; cool. Another LEGO build, our readers will like that one; cool. Someone selling their old Atari, maybe? Pffft, whatever, move on. LEGO creation; cool. Wait, go back. Was that? Holy shnikies, that’s LEGO! That reaction is courtesy of Joe Klang and every bit of this stellar Atari 2600 is genuine LEGO. The Atari logo is comprised of 1×2 curved slopes, the chrome jack is a harpoon piece and even the rubber bands are LEGO. Notoriously spotty quality control with brown works in Joe’s favor here as it replicates woodgrain nicely. Even the Pitfall box art with its 8-bit graphics are well played indeed!

Atari VCS 2600 recreated in LEGO

LEGO unveils life-size D-O droid from Star Wars at Toy Fair New York, available in April [News]

LEGO has revealed the latest life-size LEGO Star Wars brick-built figure: the droid D-O from Star Wars: Rise of Skywalker. Live from the show floor at 2020 Toy Fair New York, we have close-up images of the upcoming UCS-like set, 75278 D-O, which includes 519 pieces and will retail for US $69.99 starting on April 19th ahead of the “May the Fourth” Star Wars holiday.

D-O comes hot on the heels of the newly announced LEGO Star Wars sets based on The Mandalorian revealed earlier this week.

Click to take a closer look at D-O

Building LEGO Masters: Exclusive interview with Brick Artist Nathan Sawaya [News]

Continuing our series of behind-the-scenes articles about LEGO Masters, we chatted with Brick Artist Nathan Sawaya in his California studio about how he built all the props for the show, what kind of deadlines he faced, and working with LEGO as a creative medium.

The first half of our interview (conducted jointly with Brickset) focuses on his work with LEGO Masters and serving as their “brick artist in residence.” The second half discusses his personal views on LEGO as a whole, his traveling LEGO installation “Art of the Brick,” and how he went from an NYC lawyer to an LA artist.

Read our interview with LEGO Masters brick artist in residence Nathan Sawaya