Tag Archives: Town

Towns in the world of LEGO have everything cities in the real world do — police stations, fire engines, trains, hairdressers and veterinarians. Check out all the beautiful buildings and vehicles we’ve featured here on The Brothers Brick.

Before Rocky shows up

You’d imagine a LEGO gym model would be stuffed full of minifigs in exercise poses. Not so this scene from Mrbones Bricks — the place is completely empty except for the lonely janitor. The gym’s interior is nicely built — don’t miss the hanging punchbag, the lockers, and the electrical conduit and fuseboxes on the wall. However, it’s the composition of the photo which turns this into a striking image. The expanse of empty floor awaiting the janitor’s attention creates a real sense of emptiness and quiet.

Lonely Janitor

Silly readers, bookshelves are for displaying LEGO!

Some builders go years without sharing any of their builds online, but the LEGO creations can be worth the wait. We featured a lovely LEGO Tardis by Alan McMorran way back in 2008 (and I had the pleasure of meeting Alan in person at BrickCon the next year). Alan is back with a fantastic bridge that spans shelves at two different levels in his study.

The Constantine Lego Bridge

Alan tells me that the “Constantine Bridge” was inspired by the old London Bridge and the Ponte Vecchio in Venice — houses and their residents crowding the arch.

Click to see more of this great integration of LEGO and interior design

Chill out in this beautifully serene LEGO spa

Heikki Mattila has built a wonderfully calm LEGO spa. The details here are simply perfect — the bath itself, the drinks shelf, the candles, and the nice touch of the rolled towels and soap on the little table. That back wall tiling is very well done, exactly the sort of color scheme and layout you’d expect to find in such a classy and relaxing venue. Normally I’m not a fan of room models without some kind of minifig presence to bring them to life, but this scene doesn’t need it. In fact, the absence of minifigs only serves to enhance the sense of peace and quiet.

Spa

I love the Java Jive and it loves me

Everything is awesome in the morning, as Miro Dudas brings us a wonderful coffee vendor stall called the Cup o’ Java. The shaping of the drinks stand itself, and its brilliant steam effect, are the obvious stars of the show, but don’t miss the lovely paving around the stall and the curved planters. And there’s just enough minifig action going on to create a sense of hustle and bustle — I’m imagining all these guys are grabbing a caffeine boost on their way to work downtown.

Cup o' Java

Fill up at this futuristic gas station

crises_crs has catered for those urgent requirements for high altitude gas refueling in his latest build, a Dieselpunk gas station. Crises was inspired by the mind-bending futuristic art work of Argentinian artist Alejandro Burda and his ACA service station.

Gas station

Tiny nuclear cooling towers look less ominous in LEGO

Admittedly power plants are not a common subject for LEGO builders, so seeing one is always fun. WHBRICKS gives us this adorable tiny nuclear plant, which is lovely in its simplicity. It’s highly recognizable and barely 12 studs long. The billowing steam is particularly nice and adds to the overall look and feel of the tiny build. This would be an excellent addition to any microscale layout!

cooling towers

LEGO baby delivered in style

Angela Chung has made great use of the new baby minifig in an excellent hospital scene depicting the arrival of a new baby. Sometimes “obvious parts usage” makes for the best models.

Welcome a new life

The details of the delivery room surrounding the central action are nicely done with a variety of mobile medical machinery at the ready. I particularly like the incubator trolley with it’s little heat lamp waiting to keep the new arrival cosy. However, close attention to the scene does raise one troubling question…what is the screwdriver for? Regardless, this is a lovely model, and is all the more refreshing for depicting the sort of real-life events we don’t often see “in the brick”.

Then & Now with Doris the aging minifig

TBB contributor Elspeth De Montes has been working on a fantastic series of scenes contrasting the life of a woman named Doris in 1966 and later in her life today, in 2016. Originally built for and published in Bricks magazine, Elspeth’s scenes are not only well-built LEGO creations, but also poignant and funny. She describes her Doris series thus: “On the left it is 1966 and she is a young vibrant lady in touch with the latest fashion, technology and trends. On the right, time has passed and it is 2016 and Doris has to cope with new technology, innovation and the changes in society.”

In Elspeth’s first scene, Doris happily tosses her rubbish out in 1966, but struggles to sort her recyclables in 2016. What impresses me most about this scene is how many LEGO trash cans in various colors Elspeth owns!

Taking Out The Trash 1966 vs 2016

Click through to see all of Doris’s adventures through the years

LEGO Peel P50 microcar is only missing LEGO Jeremy Clarkson [Video]

Peel Engineering on the Isle of Man in the Irish Sea manufactured the P50 microcar at the height of Mod fashion in the heyday of “Swinging London.” Vimal Patel (vmln8r on Flickr) has lovingly handcrafted a beautiful blue LEGO P50 that’s fully motorized, with great curves that make the little “bubble car” instantly recognizable.

Peel P50

Click through to see an adorable pug dog play with this adorable LEGO car!

A classy bar worthy of any LEGO town

I am not familiar with the comedy stylings of Les Inconnus, but I know that this LEGO Le F** Blue Bar based on that French comedy sketch is quite striking. Builder Kloou used vibrant, contrasting colors and tons of little details to make this build shine. The back of the building swings open on a hinge revealing a completely furnished interior. Perhaps the most noticeable feature of this bar is the great brick-built lettering, but my favorite detail is that door with the little sliding panel which I presume is used for asking “what’s the password?”

Le F** Blue Bar

Gini’s Home Electrical Store is now open on BrickHills Avenue

It is the early 1960s and we are going for a stroll down BrickHills Avenue with builder Andrew Tate. Andrew has created a lovely scene with Art Deco-inspired architecture centering on Gini’s home electrical store on the corner. There is definitely evidence of the source of inspiration being a movie theater, and Andrew mentions the Warner Beverly Hills theater and Sunset Boulevard theatre at Disney Studios in his own description.

Brickhills Avenue

This build is not just a façade, as Andrew has also designed some interior views.   The image below is clearly from Gini’s home electrical store.  It looks to be a source for colourful refrigerators, washing machines and expensive cookers — more than enough to meet the desires of a mini-housewife!

Brickhills Avenue

This roof is driving me bananas!

In yet another repudiation of the idea that LEGO pieces are only good for the purpose originally intended by their designers, alego alego has built a yellow thatched roof made entirely of LEGO bananas. And the cabin itself is built almost completely from brown Technic connectors. The base of this treehouse is also quite lovely, with a stone pathway, well, and lovely little bushes.

Maison d'Assurancetourix

My only critique is that a lovely LEGO creation like this feels a little underpopulated without some characters to enjoy the scenery.