Tag Archives: The LEGO Movie

Friday Night Fights: In pursuit of Exo-llence

Welcome back fight fans, to Sin City Nevada for another round of Friday Night Fights. Tonight we join an ongoing fray, as the LEGO world continues to be gripped with Exo-suit mania. Hec, even the animals are getting in on the action! But let’s up the ante and give this a cinematic twist, shall we?

In the R-rated corner, we have a recreation of an A.P.U. from The Matrix Trilogy by Niki Dregant:

While over in the PG-rated corner, lurks a Unikitty-piloted Cloud Cuckoo Land Mech by Martin Gee:

As usual, constant reader, you are tasked with deciding, by way of comment, who will stomp their way to glory, and who is destined for the scrap heap. On the last edition of Friday Night Fights, Devil in the architecture Details, Nick Barrett’s Georgian town house prevailed with a monumental score of 11-0. Tune in next week for another action packed edition of Friday Night Fights!

Cloud Cuckoopocalypse

Being the only builder gutsy enough ever to attempt a minifig scaled version of Howl’s moving castle, it’s comes as no surprise to discover that Imagine Rigney was behind this mind-bending recreation of the fall of Cloud Cuckoo Land from The LEGO Movie

But the diorama just wouldn’t be complete without our heros escaping in the Bat Submarine. So he build that too, naturally. Awesome!

This makes me really wish LEGO would put out more official sets based on that particular region of the LEGO Movie universe. However, if anyone suggests the above creations be submitted as projects to the Lego Ideas site, be warned: I will reach through the screen and slap you!

“I only work in black. And sometimes, very, very dark gray.”

One of my favorite characters in The LEGO Movie is Will Arnett’s Batman. His Batwing is also rather awesome. Stefan Edlinger (Brickmasta) loved it so much he decided the Batwing deserved the real LEGO treatment.

The Batwing - Front

Stefan spent several months amassing the parts and reverse-engineering the model from the movie (and accompanying video game). The process proved challenging, because as Stefan puts it “Clearly the mechanics and physics in the movie and the game are different, easier, lighter to make it possible for such great creations to exist.” He had to make the Batwing a lot sturdier than the construction briefly shown in the movie and video game.

You can read Stefan’s full write-up and see more photos on Flickr and MOCPages.

In-Depth Look at The LEGO Movie Closing Credits

How many of you saw the LEGO movie? All of you? Excellent. Did you hear they’re doing a sequel, due in 2017? That’s pretty fantastic news to me. I’d love to go back to that world.

Art of the Title gives a really insightful walk-through of the process creating the end-credits, with all of those excellent micro-scale worlds. If you need a reminder of how awesome it really is, their article has it for you to watch and pause whenever you’d like. The article doesn’t name any fans by name, though you may recognize a couple of builds, like Bruce Lowell‘s cow skull and hot dog.

Which of the end-credit builds was your favorite?

Epic LEGO Movie Diorama by South Korean Fans

Creative quad OliveSeon have unveiled a spectacular diorama based on the recently released LEGO Movie. Collectively, this group of four South Korean fans produce some of the best dioramas in the fan community. Their latest incorporates numerous official sets while cleverly expanding upon them to capture various scenes from the film.

The LEGO Movie, now playing at a theater near you!

The LEGO Movie is out today, and since you’re reading this blog you’re probably making plans to go see it in the near future! Unlike Andrew, I’d been hyped to see this movie ever since the first trailer, and somehow the final product managed to exceed my lofty expectations.

Nick (DarthNick) built this diorama as part of a display for the Toronto premiere, and I think the build (background included) does an excellent job of capturing the spirit of the film.

Astro Kitty & Angry Kitty

Simon is playing shy and not wanting to blog his own stellar creations it appears. So I will be more than happy to post this in his stead. Here’s Simon’s interpretation of Unikitty dressed in Classic Space garb from the upcoming LEGO Movie.

Astro Kitty

Edit:
I appear to have missed the fact that Simon based his Astro Kitty on Evan’s Angry Kitty. Which, no offence to Simon, is even more awesome.

Angry Uni-kitty.

I have yet to see the movie, but am anxiously awaiting the release date in my home town (despite my local theatre being old and smelly). In the meantime I will just continue to enjoy all the fan built creations inspired by what appears to be a hit in the making.

Full of sly humor, The LEGO Movie is a must-watch for all LEGO fans – especially adults [Review]

I’ll admit it: I had very low expectations for The LEGO Movie. The first trailers were annoying more than anything else, and — out of context from the movie — I wasn’t especially impressed with the corresponding sets (which LEGO sent us to review a while ago — they’re actually pretty great parts packs). But this evening I joined scores of local LEGO fans, press, and others at an early screening, and the movie won me over from the first moments on screen.

The LEGO Movie

Written and directed by Phil Lord and Chris Miller (whose previous writing/directing collaboration is Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs), The LEGO Movie begins when Emmet (Chris Pratt) wakes up one morning and heads to his construction job, following instructions every step of the way. You can infer most of the lessons that the movie will convey from that premise alone — yes, there are plenty of nods to creativity, teamwork, and other wonderful sentiments. But there’s a lot more to this movie than bang-you-over-the-head morals in the vein of Toy Story 3.

The LEGO Movie: BatmanFirst and foremost, the movie is full of subtle references to LEGO arcana from the past 35 years. I won’t spoil any of the surprises, but the inclusion of a blue Classic Space minifig with a cracked visor should be evidence enough that this isn’t just a movie for boys aged 6-12 whose idea of LEGO is Ninjago and Legends of Chima.

Similarly, and less obscurely, well-timed cameos from completely unexpected parts of the LEGO universe (no, not that LEGO Universe) had the audience roaring with approval. The voice acting is impressive, but don’t go looking up the credits yet or you’ll spoil many of the surprises. And forget Ben Affleck, I want Will Arnett as the next Batman.

The animation style is rather striking. Unlike the flat, uniform style we’ve all gotten used to in LEGO video games, the move essentially looks like it was animated with real bricks. More interestingly, the pieces — especially the minifigs — show lots of play wear. The minifigs also move with the limitations inherent to their form; you’ll never see a minifig bending at the knee or flexing a claw hand.

The LEGO Movie: Blue Spaceman

There’s a final plot twist that comes as a complete but totally natural surprise. With plenty of foreshadowing, this final twist fits perfectly with what you’ve seen throughout the rest of the movie — an indication of good writing by Lord and Miller. Even better, it’s clear that they’re very aware of patterns of thinking among adult fans.

Overall, I can unreservedly recommend The LEGO Movie. This isn’t a movie about LEGO the beloved brand or corporation. Nor is it really a movie about bricks or even creativity. Fundamentally, The LEGO Movie is a movie for LEGO fans and about LEGO fans. It’s also just plain entertaining. Set aside your preconceptions and go see it.

The LEGO Movie opens this Friday, February 7th.

As a final note, I’m interested to learn how LEGO builders we know were involved in making the movie — Facebook lately has been full of subtle references to recent projects with a forthcoming reveal and early cast & crew screenings. Watching the credits, it was great to see designer Matthew Ashton get an Executive Producer credit.

I’d love to hear what you think, too. Feel free to discuss your thoughts in the comments, but please keep the discussion spoiler-free through opening weekend.