Tag Archives: Technic

The LEGO Technic line was first released as “Expert Builder” sets in 1977, and LEGO has been producing Technic ever since, including Bionicle and MINDSTORMS. The custom Technic models featured here on The Brothers Brick include some pretty crazy and amazing mechanisms that’ll blow your mind, from self-sorting LEGO to automated Rubik’s Cube solvers.

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder’s Guide [Review]

No Starch Press recently sent us a review copy of their latest Technic offering, The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder’s Guide by Paweł “Sariel” Kmieć.

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder's Guide

I found the book to be full of very useful information. I am not an expert Technic builder by any means and when I first thumbed through the book I was overwhelmed by the amount of detail that the book offers. However, when I actually started reading the book, I found that the way Paweł presents the information made everything very clear. He starts with basic concepts and then builds upon them throughout the book in a very clear and concise fashion. I think any adult LEGO fan will be able to follow this book and incorporate the techniques into their own creations. But this book is not for young builders. Many, if not most, of the techniques are quite advanced and would lead to frustration for younger builders.

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder's Guide

The book consists of 333 pages divided up into five parts: Basics, Mechanics, Motors, Advanced Mechanics and Models. The first three sections give you the groundwork needed to understand the Technic system and how the majority of the parts work. I found this to be very helpful. I have used many Technic pieces over the years but wasn’t clear on the functions of each and every part. These first three sections are a great reference of Technic pieces and their functions, as well as being vital in introducing the terminology used throughout the rest of the book. I highly recommend reading these sections in depth and not skipping ahead.

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder's Guide

The fourth section, Advanced Mechanics, teaches you how to design and build transmissions, steering systems, suspensions for wheeled and tracked vehicles along with other concepts and ideas.

The fifth and final section instructs the reader in designing and planning their own models.

Overall, I would recommend this book for any adult builder who is interested in becoming more familiar with Technic and using Technic in their own creations. The book is well-laid out and the information is presented clearly. It is definitely an asset that deserves a place on the shelf.

Visit No Starch Press for this and other LEGO-related books. is also available on Amazon.com.

Great Great Ball Contraption

Freelance Technic blogger, Peer Kreuger (mahjqa) sends us this beauty. I agree!

While most great ball contraptions are the result of a collaboration between many people, mechanical mastermind Akiyuki has been so busy building GBC modules that he made a damn impressive lineup all on his own. The intricate modules have an almost hypnotic quality to them.

Life-size Warhammer 40K Bolt Pistol

We’ve featured many of Jarek‘s Warhammer 40K creations in the past, but this is a first. Instead of scale models of vehicles or troops from the games, he’s built a life-sized gun from the game. He’s built in several cool play features, though not launching a projectile, which you can see in his youtube video, below.

wh40k Bolt Pistol

Spunky Little Roadster, Rumble Bee

Thirdwigg, inspired by using his F1 wheels, created this spunky little 3 wheeled, remote controlled Power Function Roadster.  He packs the battery pack, receiver, and self centering steering into a compact frame.  Notably, he mounted the XL Power Function Motor in the hub of the drive wheel.  Check out the video.

The best Technic arm...hands down.

Max Shepherd, a biomedical engineering major, doesn’t normally build with LEGO but when he does, it is really awesome. This fully articulated technic arm is quite incredible. I’m really impressed at how well it mimics the range and motion of a human arm and hand.

I also found this quote rather interesting.

I started following some Lego blogs, and realized that with the new stuff out (power functions, linear actuators, more connectors), there was a real opportunity to do something new.

It would be cool to know which blogs he has been following. I know we don’t highlight as much Technic, Power Functions and Mindstorms items as we should, but the blogs that do cover such things are quite good.

Read the entire story here.

LEGO sorting machine built from LEGO

The BrickIt team in Denmark has built a robotic system to sort LEGO bricks. The “Dynaway Sorting Plant” uses 28 Mindstorms NXT motors, 7 processors, 4 color sensors, and 14 touch sensors, and took over 250 hours of programming time plus 800 hours to build. The result is an amazing system that separates 2×4 and 1×2 bricks by both shape and color and then moves the pallets full of sorted bricks.

Read more about the sorting machine on BrickIt.dk.