Tag Archives: Technic

The LEGO Technic line was first released as “Expert Builder” sets in 1977, and LEGO has been producing Technic ever since, including Bionicle and MINDSTORMS. The custom Technic models featured here on The Brothers Brick include some pretty crazy and amazing mechanisms that’ll blow your mind, from self-sorting LEGO to automated Rubik’s Cube solvers.

Tiny LEGO RC Routemaster Bus

The Routemaster is almost certainly the most famous bus design in the world. And there have been many built out of LEGO, including this pair by our own Ralph. What makes this one by Gabor Horvarth special is that it manages to pack in full remote control in a very small (6 wide) package. Which I can tell you from my own less successful attempt is an incredible achievement

I first saw Gabor’s work on The LEGO Car blog.

Ready to Race with this LEGO R/C Car

Spanish LEGO fan Fernando (Sheepo) shows his crazy engineering skills with this beautiful recreation of a Caterham 7, a small British sports car. Technic builders never cease to amaze me with the amount of functionality they can build entirely with brick and still pack into a small frame, and this model is at the top of the game. It’s got all the LEGO R/C car bells and whistles, including disk brakes, a full transmission, and complete suspension.

iPhone Gaming Stand by Cam M.

Cam M. built himself a nifty little stand to hold his iPhone so that he can actually steer while playing car racing games. Cam utilized a Smallworks Brickcase to attach the phone, but it would still be possible to do something like this without such a case. I think I may have just found myself a project for this weekend.

iPhone Gaming Stand

Here it is in action:

Edit
It appears we have featured this type of thing previously, however, this doesn’t make Cam’s any less awesome :)

Making Time: LEGO Ball Clock by Jason Allemann

Here’s a really gorgeous piece of horological gadgetry. Not satisfied with those giant LEGO minifigure digital clocks, Jason Allemann has built a mechanical timepiece worthy of any classy desk. Better yet, he’s made a video showing it in motion and given lots of details on how it works.

LEGO Ball Clock - Details

LEGO minifig-scale ultra-class Liebherr T 282B haul truck by M_longer

We’ve featured many gloriously oversized LEGO vehicles by Marek Markiewicz (M_longer) over the years, including his L 580 wheel loader, TH550 underground mining truck, and Caterpillar 24M grader. Marek’s latest truck is the massive — and fully motorized — Liebherr T 282B haul truck, used in mining and heavy construction.

Liebherr T 282B

Marek’s model is fully functional, with working steering and tipper. You can watch this beast in action in his video on YouTube.

Fully functional 1:12 LEGO Supermarine Spitfire Mk IIa can do everything but fly

At the end of December, Kyle Wigboldy (thirdwigg) posted a LEGO Spitfire fighter plane from World War II that has the most functions I’ve ever seen in a LEGO plane.

Spitfire Right

Kyle spent about six months on his Spitfire, and the finished model has a wingspan of 112 studs and is 96 studs long. Not only is the Spitfire model gorgeous (too many LEGO Technic models are just skeletons in odd colors), it also includes lots of functionality:

  • Spinning propeller with adjustable prop pitch
  • Rolls-Royce Merlin V12 engine with working pistons
  • Working landing gear
  • Cockpit joystick and pedals that connect to working control surfaces
  • Working rudder, elevator, and ailerons

The YouTube video shows off all the moving parts.

Read Kyle’s full writeup on Thirdwigg.com, and a more complete review on TechnicBRICKs.

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder’s Guide [Review]

No Starch Press recently sent us a review copy of their latest Technic offering, The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder’s Guide by Paweł “Sariel” Kmieć.

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder's Guide

I found the book to be full of very useful information. I am not an expert Technic builder by any means and when I first thumbed through the book I was overwhelmed by the amount of detail that the book offers. However, when I actually started reading the book, I found that the way Paweł presents the information made everything very clear. He starts with basic concepts and then builds upon them throughout the book in a very clear and concise fashion. I think any adult LEGO fan will be able to follow this book and incorporate the techniques into their own creations. But this book is not for young builders. Many, if not most, of the techniques are quite advanced and would lead to frustration for younger builders.

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder's Guide

The book consists of 333 pages divided up into five parts: Basics, Mechanics, Motors, Advanced Mechanics and Models. The first three sections give you the groundwork needed to understand the Technic system and how the majority of the parts work. I found this to be very helpful. I have used many Technic pieces over the years but wasn’t clear on the functions of each and every part. These first three sections are a great reference of Technic pieces and their functions, as well as being vital in introducing the terminology used throughout the rest of the book. I highly recommend reading these sections in depth and not skipping ahead.

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder's Guide

The fourth section, Advanced Mechanics, teaches you how to design and build transmissions, steering systems, suspensions for wheeled and tracked vehicles along with other concepts and ideas.

The fifth and final section instructs the reader in designing and planning their own models.

Overall, I would recommend this book for any adult builder who is interested in becoming more familiar with Technic and using Technic in their own creations. The book is well-laid out and the information is presented clearly. It is definitely an asset that deserves a place on the shelf.

Visit No Starch Press for this and other LEGO-related books. is also available on Amazon.com.

Great Great Ball Contraption

Freelance Technic blogger, Peer Kreuger (mahjqa) sends us this beauty. I agree!

While most great ball contraptions are the result of a collaboration between many people, mechanical mastermind Akiyuki has been so busy building GBC modules that he made a damn impressive lineup all on his own. The intricate modules have an almost hypnotic quality to them.