Tag Archives: Sculpture

It’s hard to define which LEGO models are sculptural and which are just a regular pile of bricks, but we know a good sculpture when we see one — even if it’s a funny cartoon character and not the Venus de Milo.

A way of life

Capturing the human form in LEGO bricks is challenging at the best of times, which is why builders either plumb for a combination of complex parts and techniques, or go the other direction and use basic bricks but scale up their creations. However, the work of British builder David Hughes seems to lie somewhere in between these two extremes, with sculptures that require relatively few bricks and relatively little detail to capture the essence of their subject. Here, in a memorable pose, is Jimmy from the classic 1979 “angry young man” movie Quadrophenia:

French artist builds huge metal LEGO minifigures that are completely poseable

Ever wanted a giant LEGO minifigure? French artist Mat Green, who specializes in welding, decided to put his considerable metal-working skills to use crafting these remarkably accurate renditions of a LEGO minifigure and a LEGO skeleton. Mat tells us it took him two months to craft the minifigure, whom he’s named Hugo. Hugo weighs 110 pounds and stands over four feet tall. The coolest thing about Hugo though, is that he’s just as poseable as his plastic siblings. Mat then created Pablo, whom he says is a Mexican punk rocker skeleton. Pablo weighs 130¬†pounds, and comes with a removable Mohawk.

See more of Hugo and Pablo

Quick! Hide your chrome LEGO pieces from this curious magpie!

Birds have already become an independent genre of brick-built sculptures. And whether they’re redoubtable birds of prey or it’s a sly magpie — as built by AnActionfigure here — they all look fascinating and wonderfully realistic.


The title picture of the model barely reveals its main peculiarity. Besides an astonishing, instantly recognizable shape for the bird, its color scheme is much more interesting than one may think. Dark green and dark blue pieces, which are clearly visible from another angle, create the same play of colors as real feathers.


Let’s make Captain America great again

Unless you’ve been living under a rock this week – or just aren’t that interested in the Marvel superhero universe – you’ll no doubt have witnessed all the unnecessary media drama over the shocking plot twist revealed in the latest Captain America comic book series. Even though it’s common knowledge at this point, I won’t even repeat it here, seeing how spoiler sensitive we’ve all become!

But I will report that builder Taylor Walker claims he had absolutely no foreknowledge of this news when he originally built this rather impressive (and strangely modified) life-size version of Captain America’s iconic shield. Courtesy of Flickr user Sir Glub, here is Taylor’s shield on display recently at BrickCan 2016 in Vancouver, alongside the LEGO Mjolnir that he co-built with his brother Brandon:

And here is a closer look at that amazing pattern work, from the builder himself:

Build your cake and eat it too

Sometimes LEGO looks good enough to eat, and this is certainly the case with Sad Brick‘s Cranberry Black Forest cake. This plastic take on the classic German desert appears to have the key ingredients of chocolate sponge, cream, kirsch, more cream and a black cherry on top. A puzzle for you: do you know which part has been used to depict the cherry?

Cranberry Black Forest Cake

The best part is that this cake is definitely fat-free.

Bitten by the building bug

I will confess that in middle school I was obsessed with insects, kept many varieties of them, and wanted to be an entomologist when I grew up. Yet now I absolutely can’t stand bugs at all! Funny how things change. Anyway, back in those days I really wanted to create anatomically correct 3D models of my favorite bugs in art class, but somehow never managed to figure out how. So these two recent brick-built insect creations were a very satisfying discovery. If the parts had been available back then, I would probably have just gone down this route myself!

  Ant by BricksRaven

  Grasshopper by Mr Unknown

Peace, LEGO, Unity and Respect

Nostalgic for the “gabber” electronic dance music scene of 1990’s Netherlands, Dutch builder Chris van Vliet built this amazing three-dimensional LEGO recreation the Masters of Hardcore logo (a record label and series of EDM festivals). The sculpture – which resembles the giant goat skull that used to grace the stage at these events – is comprised almost entirely of LEGO bricks kept from that era, and has even been beautifully black-lit.

Chris also gives us a couple of extra treats in the form of detailed work in progress photos showing how the entire creation came together, and a short video of two brick-built gabber fans in action! And not satisfied with recreating just one gabber-era logo, Chris even produced this sculpture of the Thunderdome “Thunder Wizzard” logo, which when you compare it to the original is clearly spot on!


A well-placed illusion

When I saw this sculpture by Chris Maddison, I didn’t think it was possible for all the pieces to be freestanding and connected. Even if supports were used, I couldn’t imagine how they could be Lego parts given the haphazard angles that the cubes were positioned. Even zooming on the photo and examining the gaps between the bricks revealed that each small cube is supposedly made out of a plain 2×2 brick sandwiched between a plate and tile. Just when I (and many others) thought the sculpture was impossible, Chris revealed the solution to this wonderful illusion.


Beautiful LEGO sculpture glorifies the engineering mindset

Jason Allemann presents a brilliant model built by his partner Kristal — a stunning piece of kinetic sculpture designed to represent what goes on inside the mind of a LEGO engineer.

The Engineer

As a fully-fledged steampunk geek, you can imagine what the video of this creation in action did to me. This is absolute genius — expanding platforms, rising towers, crank-powered electric lighting. Check it out, it’s genuinely brilliant…

Self-portrait bust in LEGO bricks

Julius von Brunk built this amazing self-portrait bust in LEGO bricks. There’s great brickwork here, capturing the curves, planes, and lines of a head and face more accurately than you’d expect possible using plastic blocks. But for me, the main attraction is that raised eyebrow. It transforms this from being a cool technical achievement into a genuine portrait with a sense of character.