Tag Archives: Sculpture

It’s hard to define which LEGO models are sculptural and which are just a regular pile of bricks, but we know a good sculpture when we see one — even if it’s a funny cartoon character and not the Venus de Milo.

Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake in LEGO

Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake is iconic. It’s a familiar love story of the White Swan, Odette, and Prince Sigfried. One thing I always thought was amazing was Odile’s fouettés: this is where the dancer spins 360 degrees, on pointe. Odile does them to “steal” the prince, and the original ballerina could do 32 in a row.

In 1995, choreographer Matthew Bourne left his mark on Swan Lake with one major change: the swan’s gender. Odette and the corps de ballet, traditionally danced by ballerinas, was now performed by male dancers. David Hughes has given us this glorious and very recognizable sculpture of the Lead Swan in the classic pose, used by the dancers to imitate some bird-like moves giving grace to the dance.

The White Swan

Illustrating culture with LEGO

ArzLan shows us there is beauty in simplicity with this stunning build. Included are various representations of Chinese culture, with a seated figure playing the Ehru (a two-stringed fiddle). Also pictured is a Go board, and supplies for calligraphy and painting.

There are a number of eye catching things here; the seated figure stands out in bright red, and the scroll background has brick-built calligraphy.

I particularly love the dragon brush holder. It’s so fragile and perfectly executed.

琴棋書畫

Life-sized scale models in LEGO

Wait…I know what you are thinking, The Brothers Brick lets another sister start blogging and she gets distracted and starts posting about fashion and sewing machine techniques! Look again: the items adorning this table are life-sized scale models all built with LEGO bricks. The Singer sewing machine, glasses, scissors and tailor’s chalk are very accurately depicted using LEGO as part of an exhibition called the Tiong Bahru Show by The Brick Collective that took place at Temasek Polytechnic in Singapore.

The Brick Collective: Tiong Bahru Show

Another scene from The Brick Collective show is a typical cafe in the 1980s  with some snacks, drinks and the classic Coca-Cola sign on the wall.  When I say typical, clearly this is location dependant as Green Spot, Egg tarts, Siew Mai were not on the menu in my hometown of Glasgow, Scotland in the 1980s.

The Brick Collective: Tiong Bahru Show

If you want a closer look and images of further scaled LEGO builds that appeared in the show, then you will find more within crayonbricks album on Flickr.

Poland’s tallest building created in LEGO

The Palace of Culture and Science is the tallest building in Poland and dominates the skyline of the Polish capital, Warsaw. Łukasz Libuszewski has not only recreated the building in LEGO but has also managed to capture his creation in a beautifully atmospheric photograph.

pkin3

The building’s art deco style is achieved with clean lines, grille tiles for the tall windows and some lovely detailing using texture bricks. I particularly like the seemingly simple parts used by the builder to represent the decorative masonry atop the walls, the original architect purposefully copied this from Renaissance houses and palaces of Kraków and Zamośćthat – a tile with clip and technic gear rack.

PKiN

The full sets of photographs and views of the Palace of Culture and Science can be seen on Flickr.

Eat fresh!

These larger-than-life sculptures by Bruce Lowell look more like pixelated photos than LEGO creations. Seriously, just squint your eyes a bit and these lunchtime treats look just like the real thing! I particularly love how Bruce captured the Subway and Lay’s logos perfectly, even on three-dimensional surfaces. And while it normally bothers me to see an underlying color showing through to a top layer of a different color, allowing the white layer to show through on the stair-stepped portion of the raw red onions is simply genius!

LEGO Subway Sandwich Meal

A way of life

Capturing the human form in LEGO bricks is challenging at the best of times, which is why builders either plumb for a combination of complex parts and techniques, or go the other direction and use basic bricks but scale up their creations. However, the work of British builder David Hughes seems to lie somewhere in between these two extremes, with sculptures that require relatively few bricks and relatively little detail to capture the essence of their subject. Here, in a memorable pose, is Jimmy from the classic 1979 “angry young man” movie Quadrophenia:

French artist builds huge metal LEGO minifigures that are completely poseable

Ever wanted a giant LEGO minifigure? French artist Mat Green, who specializes in welding, decided to put his considerable metal-working skills to use crafting these remarkably accurate renditions of a LEGO minifigure and a LEGO skeleton. Mat tells us it took him two months to craft the minifigure, whom he’s named Hugo. Hugo weighs 110 pounds and stands over four feet tall. The coolest thing about Hugo though, is that he’s just as poseable as his plastic siblings. Mat then created Pablo, whom he says is a Mexican punk rocker skeleton. Pablo weighs 130 pounds, and comes with a removable Mohawk.

See more of Hugo and Pablo

Quick! Hide your chrome LEGO pieces from this curious magpie!

Birds have already become an independent genre of brick-built sculptures. And whether they’re redoubtable birds of prey or it’s a sly magpie — as built by AnActionfigure here — they all look fascinating and wonderfully realistic.

Magpie

The title picture of the model barely reveals its main peculiarity. Besides an astonishing, instantly recognizable shape for the bird, its color scheme is much more interesting than one may think. Dark green and dark blue pieces, which are clearly visible from another angle, create the same play of colors as real feathers.

Magpie

Let’s make Captain America great again

Unless you’ve been living under a rock this week – or just aren’t that interested in the Marvel superhero universe – you’ll no doubt have witnessed all the unnecessary media drama over the shocking plot twist revealed in the latest Captain America comic book series. Even though it’s common knowledge at this point, I won’t even repeat it here, seeing how spoiler sensitive we’ve all become!

But I will report that builder Taylor Walker claims he had absolutely no foreknowledge of this news when he originally built this rather impressive (and strangely modified) life-size version of Captain America’s iconic shield. Courtesy of Flickr user Sir Glub, here is Taylor’s shield on display recently at BrickCan 2016 in Vancouver, alongside the LEGO Mjolnir that he co-built with his brother Brandon:

And here is a closer look at that amazing pattern work, from the builder himself:

Build your cake and eat it too

Sometimes LEGO looks good enough to eat, and this is certainly the case with Sad Brick‘s Cranberry Black Forest cake. This plastic take on the classic German desert appears to have the key ingredients of chocolate sponge, cream, kirsch, more cream and a black cherry on top. A puzzle for you: do you know which part has been used to depict the cherry?

Cranberry Black Forest Cake

The best part is that this cake is definitely fat-free.