Tag Archives: Power Functions

Ready to Race with this LEGO R/C Car

Spanish LEGO fan Fernando (Sheepo) shows his crazy engineering skills with this beautiful recreation of a Caterham 7, a small British sports car. Technic builders never cease to amaze me with the amount of functionality they can build entirely with brick and still pack into a small frame, and this model is at the top of the game. It’s got all the LEGO R/C car bells and whistles, including disk brakes, a full transmission, and complete suspension.

LEGO GAGA: The Built This Way Ball.

Paul Hetherington (Brickbaron) must be a little monster because he recently spent quite a bit of time and effort on recreating Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way” concert tour from 2012. If you consult the full set, you can find the major highlights and set-changes from the entire big-budget extravaganza. This particular part of the performance is entitled “Highway Unicorn”.

Lego Lady Gaga, Highway Unicorn

Not content to merely build a copy of the stage, Paul went the extra mile and made a video for the song “Just Dance” using LEGO Power Functions motors to control the animation of portions of the set and Gaga’s backup dancers. For you stat-freaks out there, over 700 minifigures were used to create the audience.

Tow with a pro

LegoMarat brings you some remote-controlled action tonight with his rendition of an Illinois Department of Transportation International 4400 tow truck. Not content to merely nail the shaping for the exterior, he also packed in a working front and rear suspension, opening doors, 6 motors, 3 IR receivers, and a battery box to bring it all to life. This model brings out the Tonka-Truck loving little kid in me and I want to take it out to the sandbox.

Description

The rugged model also features a working fork that is capable of lifting a 2kg load. Don’t believe me?…check out the handy instructional video that highlights all the wonderful power-function driven features of the IDOT wrecker.

Tow truck video

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder’s Guide [Review]

No Starch Press recently sent us a review copy of their latest Technic offering, The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder’s Guide by Paweł “Sariel” Kmieć.

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder's Guide

I found the book to be full of very useful information. I am not an expert Technic builder by any means and when I first thumbed through the book I was overwhelmed by the amount of detail that the book offers. However, when I actually started reading the book, I found that the way Paweł presents the information made everything very clear. He starts with basic concepts and then builds upon them throughout the book in a very clear and concise fashion. I think any adult LEGO fan will be able to follow this book and incorporate the techniques into their own creations. But this book is not for young builders. Many, if not most, of the techniques are quite advanced and would lead to frustration for younger builders.

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder's Guide

The book consists of 333 pages divided up into five parts: Basics, Mechanics, Motors, Advanced Mechanics and Models. The first three sections give you the groundwork needed to understand the Technic system and how the majority of the parts work. I found this to be very helpful. I have used many Technic pieces over the years but wasn’t clear on the functions of each and every part. These first three sections are a great reference of Technic pieces and their functions, as well as being vital in introducing the terminology used throughout the rest of the book. I highly recommend reading these sections in depth and not skipping ahead.

The Unofficial LEGO Technic Builder's Guide

The fourth section, Advanced Mechanics, teaches you how to design and build transmissions, steering systems, suspensions for wheeled and tracked vehicles along with other concepts and ideas.

The fifth and final section instructs the reader in designing and planning their own models.

Overall, I would recommend this book for any adult builder who is interested in becoming more familiar with Technic and using Technic in their own creations. The book is well-laid out and the information is presented clearly. It is definitely an asset that deserves a place on the shelf.

Visit No Starch Press for this and other LEGO-related books. is also available on Amazon.com.

Enter the FUN HAUS! A celebration of life ... through death!

Continuing our coverage of great LEGO models debuted at BrickCon 2012, Paul Hetherington just posted his FUN HAUS! building, which won “Best in Town.” (Paul has a serious winning streak going — he also won Town trophies in 2010 and 2011, and won our “Best Apocafied Building” prize during Zombie Apocafest 2009 for his Turns at Midnight carousel.)

FUN HAUS!

Paul’s funhouse was inspired by the Mexican Day of the Dead (Dia de los Muertos) celebrations, as well as the work of artist Pooch. The building features moving cars as well as letters, so the video is well worth a watch.

FUN HAUS! VIDEO

Elemental Attack on Avalonia

ZCerberus sure knows how to build a nice castle village scene. The elemental monster is also a cool creation by itself. But, what really caught my attention on this MOC is the ingenious use of Power Functions on the scene. Both the moving tentacles and the leaning tower are what makes this creation really great.

Watch the video on YouTube.

Spunky Little Roadster, Rumble Bee

Thirdwigg, inspired by using his F1 wheels, created this spunky little 3 wheeled, remote controlled Power Function Roadster.  He packs the battery pack, receiver, and self centering steering into a compact frame.  Notably, he mounted the XL Power Function Motor in the hub of the drive wheel.  Check out the video.