Tag Archives: Nature

Then nightly sings the staring owl

Owls are mainly nocturnal, solitary birds of prey who are known for their silent flight. Most birds of prey have eyes on the sides of their heads, but the owl’s forward-facing eyes facilitate their low-light hunting. Shawn Snyder has created a LEGO owl with plenty of attitude and a somewhat impudent glare. This is an owl who knows his position, with those piercing, hooded eyes, sharp talons on show, and wings spread wide in an act of defiance.

Owl_front

That’s a lot of character to be displayed by a brick-built owl – I feel watched.

Beautiful and dangerous

This entry for the ABS Builder Challenge by Brother Steven is simply prickle-licious. The dark red and bright yellow of the desert flower really make the creation leap out, contrasting beautifully against the green cactus. And those olive spines are so prickly they almost sting your eyes. This build is simple, elegant, and perfect. I love that it comes with a cheeky note from the builder: “A gift to my competition. Handle with care.” Brilliant!

Desert Flower

Art imitates life with a plastic pine cone

I am mesmerized by this delicate pine cone by Cecilie Fritzvold. I just can’t figure out how she built it! The branch of the pine tree completes this snowy scene. The branch is nearly as delicate as the pine cone itself. I love how this beautiful scene is built using simple parts, including clips and 3-stud long rods. The Nexo Knight’s shield as the pine cone’s scales works very well too.

Pine cone

Flower firepower

Billions of years from now, plants will have evolved numerous defence mechanisms to ward off hungry herbivores, but none as extreme as this hibiscus by Grant Davis. I love the perfect blending of organic and mechanical elements, which makes the creation look very realistic for a robot flower. The builder says this is practice outside the castle theme in which he usually builds. But with the new LEGO Nexo Knights series, the definition of LEGO castle may officially include robots now, too!

Hibiscus Cannon

You’ll remember me when the west wind moves upon the fields of green

Don’t you think there are too many spaceships and interstellar fighters prowling around the international LEGO space lately? Of course, their top-class designs are undeniable, but how about taking just a day off and spending it somewhere in a calm restful rural place? This vast diorama by Piotr Machalski, a talented builder from Poland, is full of soft summer sun and serenity. Even though the actual size of the build is 25 m2, it can hardly contain a huge century-old oak and just a little bit of a field by the farm.

Chronicles of dirt-poor farmer of- dirt,

Hurry up to see some brilliant close-ups of the diorama as the author promises to extend his creation with new territory.

Plow up guy

Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale!

It’s been many years since I last attempted to conquer Herman Melville’s masterpiece Moby Dick, and it haunts me to this day. And when I spy that inscrutable thing again on a shelf, to the last page I shall grapple with it. Japanese builder aurore&aube (aurore&aube) has conquered the white whale in LEGO form, with Moby Dick ascending from the deep to harry Captain Ahab and the Pequod. Using wedges and curved slopes, the builder has captured the essential shape of the sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus. The red interior of his open maw is a lovely touch.

白鯨 010

Oddly perhaps, Moby Dick is a popular subject of LEGO models. Don’t miss Captain Ahab being dragged into the deep by Letranger Absurde and Ryan Rubino’s white whale battling a giant squid.

What does the fox say?

Nothing. It’s too dang cold for this beautifully crafted LEGO animal to waste energy on words. Instead, it waits patiently for a morsel of protein to sally forth from a hole in the snow. Although the woodland creatures of Miro Dudas are breathtaking to behold, don’t forget to notice the expertly detailed tuft of grass yearning for spring, or the complex topography of the pristine frozen landscape. Winter has come.

Winter Fox Hunt

And what does the wolf say? Something along the lines of “Arrr-ooooo!” Which, strangely, is also what a pirate says when he sees a nice boat.

Call of the Wild

The changing seasons in LEGO microscale

Normally there are only four seasons each year, but Emil Lidé has created a series of six microscale landscapes to capture all the changing colours found in nature throughout the year. Each of the six scenes depicts a trio of trees and ground foliage using the LEGO colour palate to full effect, especially those vibrant autumnal tones.

Micro Seasons

Emil’s trees are fantastic of course – he kindly shared his methods for constructing LEGO trees earlier this month. Interestingly, Emil tells us that the initial starting point for these was this cool technique for a base by o0ger, and the circular bases are a great way to keep each scene compact and contained. My own favourite is definitely late autumn.

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The moon howls for no wolf

It’s hard to believe that dogs like pugs are descended from wolves, but DNA doesn’t lie. I love my little domesticated canines, but I deeply admire the wild ones that keep ecosystems healthy. legostrator follows up on his excellent LEGO elephants with this lonely wolf looking pensive in the moonlight. The wolf with its mix of LEGO colors and textures accurately captures the look of a wolf’s fur, but be sure to take a closer look at the excellent winter landscaping and denuded tree as well.

Wolf

Like a chameleon

I would like you all to appreciate the fact that I did not make a Culture Club reference in the title for this absolutely adorable pair of chameleons, brought to us by Joseph Z. This little pair of color-changing cuteness are nestled in the forest, amongst the green, chowin’ down on what looks like quite the tasty insect snack.

As clever as the chameleons are, I would love to get a better peek at that purple flower below!

Chameleons

Exploring the mangrove swamp

Trees are an understandably common sight among LEGO builds, but rarely does one come across a style that is truly unique and breathtaking. No doubt however, that is exactly the experience shared by these lucky explorers in this latest creation by Jonas Wide. Using a large number of tail and tusk pieces, Jonas has grown an incredibly flowing and characteristic forest of mangrove trees that seems as alive as the birds and crabs that live in it.

Mangrove by Jonas Wide

Simply a tree house

Unless placing some pitiful planks on precariously low hanging branches count, I’ve never built a tree house. I’ve also never built the tree that holds up said house, nor constructed the ground beneath it. Jonas however has, with his latest creation: My Tree House

My Tree House by Jonas

Arcadian, peaceful, and stunning, Jonas has designed a deceptively complex build that any ten year old child would love to call home–at least until it’s time for dinner.

My Tree House (Up Close) by Jonas