Tag Archives: Mosaic

Everything stays right where you left it

Adventure Time, c’mon and grab your friends! We’re off to very distant lands. Lands where cute and quirky vampires like Marceline have complex relationships with Jake, Princess Bubblegum, and even the Ice King. Biczzz started this incredible mosaic as a 2D project, but then ran out of tiles. Solution: upgrade it to a 3D project! I’m glad he ran out of tiles, the depth and layering created by the cheese slopes is quite impressive.

Marceline Mosaic

May the 4th be with you!

It’s that time of the year again, and we’ll be celebrating Star Wars day here on The Brothers Brick!

The first Star Wars film was released in 1977 but it wasn’t until 1979 that the pun “may the fourth be with you” was first used, and not until 2011 that this day became the unofficial fan celebration that we now know as Star Wars day. In order to commemorate this important day, builder David Hughes created a mosaic of the beloved Rey from Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens.

May the 4th be with you

The build required 1,400 LEGO bricks, covers an area of 63 x 77 cm (25 x 30 inches), and is based on an actual promotional photograph that you can also buy as life-size cardboard cutout. The limited choice of color palette does not have an adverse effect on such a large scale mosaic, although those eyes are maybe a little too crazed for me. Anyway, this is certainly the perfect day to unveil such a wonderful creation. May the fourth be with you all today!

Yes, I’m sure this is art

Surely you’ve heard of Salvador Dalí, the great Spanish painter known for his vivid surrealist imagery. In 1976, he painted Gala contemplating the Mediterranean Sea which at a distance of 20 meters is transformed into the portrait of Abraham Lincoln, which is not totally unlike our modern “magic eye” drawings. The name may be long and unwieldly, but it’s a very literal description of the painting.

Does it work? Let’s try an experiment. Have a look at Max to the well‘s excellent representation of the painting. You can clearly see a figure standing in the middle of the model, facing away from you. That’s meant to be Gala, Dalí’s wife, staring at the sea. Now, move your chair back, away from your computer. You probably won’t be able to go 20 meters, but you can probably go 5 meters (about 16 feet). Now what do you see? Be honest, it looks a little bit like Abraham Lincoln, doesn’t it?

Gala Contemplating the Mediterranean Sea

You may now return your seat to its regular upright position.

3D golden-tail piranha

Actually, I have no idea what kind of fish this toothed-beastie is supposed to be. Regardless, this 3D mosaic by anries shop is offishally awesome. Those golden wings make great fish fins and the way Anries made colorful scales out of 1 x 1 round plates is stunning. My favorite detail is that poor worm made from two different types of LEGO snakes. It really looks like one piece suspended in water. Perhaps Anries’ next build will feature this fish mounted on the proud fisherman’s wall. Unless, of course, our fishy friend gets away with a full belly.

Poisson mosaique3D

All we are is dust in the wind

The stunningly accurate classic-rock album covers just keep coming! Following the Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd album covers we featured this month, comes W. Navarre‘s terrific LEGO version of Kansas’ Point of Know Return. Compare Navarre’s version to the original cover and you’ll see that he nailed it. I particularly love the Kansas lettering and eclipsed sun. I’m crossing my fingers that album covers will become a new LEGO building style after this bombardment of awesomeness.

Kansas Album Cover

LEGO mosaic of Hokusai’s “The Great Wave off Kanagawa”

When Iain blogged Alanboar Cheung‘s timely sculpture of Alan Rickman earlier today, I was reminded that I’d also been intending to highlight his excellent LEGO mosaic of 19th-century Japanese woodblock artist Hokusai’s famous print of “The Great Wave off Kanagawa.” For several years when I lived in Yokohama, I had a similarly distant but much less dramatic view of Mount Fuji, which I particularly enjoyed during the winter when the mountain’s peak was capped with snow. Alanboar’s mosaic uses a “studs up” technique, stacking LEGO plates rather than attaching them “studs out” on a baseplate.

LEGO The Great Wave off Kanagawa 神奈川沖浪裏

A mosaic worthy of the subject

LEGO mosaics are fascinating. I’ve never tried to build one but I would imagine it would be very difficult. Jimmy Clinch, however, seems to have had no trouble assembling this masterpiece.

Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus

The brilliant use of tan, dark tan, light grey, dark grey and even some dark green give this two-dimensional creation an amazing three-dimensional look. It’s as if you could reach out and “beep” emperor Hadrian on the nose!

The builder says that this was built to accompany the Brick to the Past group’s Roman frontier collaboration we featured a while back. Be sure to check that out if you haven’t already.

A sculptor wields the chisel, and the stricken marble grows to beauty

These sublime bas-relief LEGO sculptures are the work of mysterious new builder Bricks Noir. The skill and ingenuity behind these is so remarkable that we here at TBB are pretty sure this is an established builder working under a pseudonym. (…and we have our theories as to who!)


 

Don’t be fooled by the apparent simplicity of these pieces – the sophistication behind the builds is considerable. For example, take a closer look at the brickwork in the familiar “mudflap girl” above. Not only does the builder capture the outlines of the figures very effectively at such very small scale, with curved bricks facing in all directions, but he/she also manages to keep everything attached together and even secured to the background! I can’t wait to see what this builder does next, or how long it takes for imitators to emerge.

Click below the fold to see another great sculpture by this builder!

Raven, the Haida trickster

Chris Maddison is participating in the current round of Iron Builder, and has integrated the special seed part into a mosaic that captures the uniqe formline style of art made by the Haida, Tlingit, Coast Salish, and many other peoples who share the broad characteristics of what is commonly called Northwest Coast culture. The red and black formlines stand out from the white backdrop, and the brick-built “wooden” frame adds to the presentation. I walk past “Northwest Art” galleries in downtown Seattle everyday, and this would look right at home on a gallery wall.

Haida Bird

Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle...

…the rabbit jumped over the moon? Maybe the cow was on a break. Last night’s Super Mega Blood Death Moon was preceded by a wave of moon-themed LEGO builds and here is the first of them, from Taiwanese builder James Zhan. I have absolutely no idea as to the significance of the rocket-powered bunnie in this mosaic! Perhaps someone can fill me in?