Tag Archives: 1:1

Stun your enemies with a LEGO Counter-Strike Zeus X27

Bryce Dempsey expands his arsenal of LEGO gaming weaponry with the Zeus X27 taser featured in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. Accuracy to the in-game model in the various thicknesses throughout the body of the stun gun make Bryce’s replica stunning. Watch the builder discuss his replica taser and demonstrate the working trigger and simple firing function in this video.

If you enjoyed this model of the Zeus X27, be sure to check out these other CS:GO replicas: P90 Asiimov and PP-19 Bizon

Light up your desk with LEGO

Finding the right desk lamp can be tricky, but fans of LEGO will love this desk lamp created by Victor.  At first look, this may appear to be a functional desk lamp, but actually it’s a cleverly designed lamp made from LEGO bricks.  The lampshade is made with the shoulder armour from the Baze Malbus constraction figure, and was actually Victor’s starting point when building the lamp. Details like the little on/off button on the base and the 3mm rigid hose posing as an electrical power cable mean that this lamp is appears to be real.

Desk lamp

Smells like summertime, tastes like plastic

Though it probably wouldn’t go down smoothly, jsnyder002‘s LEGO burger and fries looks quite delicious, despite going a bit overboard with the ketchup. Contrasting textures of each ingredient, as well as two different colors for the tomato and ketchup, make this one of the best LEGO burgers I’ve seen. The use of green window shutters as lettuce is quite clever as well.

Anti-ABS Burger

The essence of art and science

Whether you need to draw something, do complicated calculations or even study some microscopic structure, Isaac Snyder has you covered. Built for a LUG display in the Strong Museum of Play in Rochester, his assortment of items connected to art, technology, science and maths includes a compass, a calculator, some pens and more. My favourite is the calculator, particularly the use of a dark nougat 1×2 tile as the “=” button. Most people would use a brighter colour in its place, although this one does have a lovely retro aesthetic to it. I do wish though, that the whole collection was built to 1:1 scale, as the smaller microscope, while looking good and accurate, simply does not fit.

Calculator and Compass

Life is like a box of chocolates

Remember that feeling when you open a brand new box of fresh chocolates and you can’t decide which one to try first? That was exactly my first impression when I came across John Snyder‘s box of LEGO sweets. Glossy tiles and dishes are coupled with thick white rubber bands, and the results really look like actual chocolate — from milk chocolate (in tan) through to rich dark bitter morsels (in dark brown). And best of all, the model has fabulous presentation — capturing the box on a dinner table with some sweets in a glass bowl.

Sumptuous Sweets

Remember, beauty is found within

The Beast’s rose by Anonymous Brick is not the first LEGO rose we’ve seen, and with recent release of the live-action version of Beauty and the Beast, I’m sure it won’t be the last. The flower’s petals, made from minifigure capes, are excellent and very natural looking, as is the nicely curved stalk. A great detail is the fallen petals, making the rose look unique. My only issue is with the model’s base, which may be a little too simple, but overall this is a beautiful LEGO creation.

Beast's Rose: Beauty and the Beast

The one that didn’t get away

Many people build animals out of LEGO, but mostly they call them something general, like “fish” or “bird”. But every now and then there is a creation like this rainbow trout by Lino Martins, which is very much specific. While the construction is simple for the most part, the trout has all the details that it needs. I knew exactly what it was just from the thumbnail, so that has to stand for something!

LEGO Rainbow Trout

Ping pong ...is not the macarena

Some creations, even if simple, just look perfect. As is the case with this table tennis build by David FNJ (Fire-Ninja Jedi). There is nothing I could think of to make this scene any better. The table with the characteristic gap, the net – everything is just as you would expect it, and I mean that in the best way. But atop of that, David presents his creation with a beautiful photo, where even the reflections look good.

Ping Pong!

If you want pictures of the full table though, you might be disappointed. The builder informs us that what you see is literally all of his dark green pieces! But I would take that as a good thing; this is a creation that pushes his collection to the limit, which is the best way for a builder to grow.

Let’s party like it’s 1984! [Instructions]

Those were the days, back when you had rewind the tape to play your favourite song again or when ‘shuffle’ meant spending hours making up a mix-tape. Hudson Rippetoe, otherwise known as Brick Classics, has found a way to capture some of those sweet musical memories with his LEGO version of the cassette tape. He has kindly provided us with these instructions so you can make your own LEGO cassette tape. Giving a mix-tape was a way to impress the ladies (or guys for that matter) and I bet presenting someone with a LEGO mix-tape will have an even better effect.

Cassette Micro Building Guide

Classic Cassette

Remember, you don’t need a pencil to fix this LEGO cassette tape if it gets stuck in the player.

Cheers, love! LEGO Tracer’s Pulse Pistols from Overwatch

Tracer has become my hero of choice when playing in Overwatch competitive play on offense. Her movement abilities suit my play style of unpredictable movement—giving me a chance to compensate for my poor aim. So my latest LEGO build is of Tracer’s primary ability, her dual rapid-fire Pulse Pistols. Constructed from 1,063 LEGO parts each (2,126 total parts for the pair), the pistols feature moving triggers, a working “reload” mechanism in which the side disks expand outward, and light-up elements powered by BrickStuff LEDs.

Tracer's Pulse Pistols - Overwatch

The most challenging part of the build was the reload mechanism. The same mechanics as in MyDifferentUsername’s KRM-262 Shotgun were used, but the mechanism had to be reduced from 4-studs wide to 3, so the disks on either side would maintain the overall 5-stud-wide model.

Tracer's Pulse Pistols - Overwatch

Watch the working features in both third person and first person viewpoints in the video below.