About Chris

Chris Malloy (porschecm2) has been a LEGO fan nearly all his life, having started with System bricks at age 3. He's been active in the online community since 2002, variously enjoying the lively families at FBTB, Classic-Space, Classic-Castle, Builder's Lounge, and Forbidden-Cove. In 2011, he finally made it to his first convention, Brickcon. He enjoys building in a wide range of themes, but keeps returning to Castle, Space, and Pirates. He has been a member of the LEGO Ambassador program since 2010. His flickr account can be found here.

Posts by Chris

LEGO reveals largest Modular Building yet, 10255 Assembly Square, to celebrate the line’s 10th anniversary [News]

It’s been 10 years since 10182 Cafe Corner released in 2006, and LEGO is celebrating in a big way by revealing the largest Modular Building yet, 10255 Assembly Square. LEGO has gone all-out with this set, fitting in two highly detailed buildings separated by an alley.

10255 Assembly Square

With 4,002 pieces, the three-story buildings are packed with detail, housing a bakery, florist’s shop, coffee shop, music store, dentist’s office, photo studio, dance studio, apartment, and a rooftop terrace. As fans of the line have come to expect, clever designs abound, with lots of great architectural details and unusual parts used in ingenious ways, including several brand-new pieces, such as 2×2 and 4×4 quarter circle tiles. See if you can spot Thor’s hammer or the Technic excavator buckets.

The set will retail for $279.99 USD, and will be available Jan. 1, 2017. (LEGO has told us that unlike many other large exclusive sets, there will not be VIP early access for this set.) Check out all the images and read the full press release below.

10255 Assembly Square fits alongside 10251 Brick Bank and 10264 Detective’s Office, the other two Modular Buildings currently available.

10255 Assembly Square10255 Assembly Square

Click through to see all the photos of 10255 Assembly Square

This LEGO warehouse is very palatable

Who doesn’t love a highly organized system of interlocking pallets? Warehouses are a marvel of modern engineering, with flurries of activity and pedantic levels of organization, and LEGO builder Norton74 says he recently visited a large warehouse and wanted to translate the scene into bricks. His use of the 1×1 Technic bricks for the adjustable shelving unit legs is great, and I love the clever way the he imitates cardboard box lids by not pressing the tiles all the way down.

Warehouse life

Repair, refuel, reload — replete with awesomeness

Frequent readers will know that we at Brothers Brick love in-situ LEGO shots, with the background presentation also being brick-built. Here’s a fine example by Brazilian builder Gilcelio Chagas of a nifty mech being serviced in a hangar bay. I love that this mech’s design incorporates the huge cockpit windscreen from the Slave I to give the pilot a fantastic view of the battle, and the refueling ports on the wall made of 2x2x2 turntable bricks makes for a great detail. And of course, I can’t overlook the terrific use the upside-down baseplates for the cool textured floor.

Time to repair!!

The classic BMW motorcycle

I do love a good bike with a classic look, and the late-50s/early 60s BMW R60 is a fine example. This LEGO version by Taiwanese builder Maxime Cheng shows off all the great lines of this old-school German bike. My favorite details are the twin bicycle seats, though Maxime’s done a fantastic job with the detail work on the engine also.



And I love this image of the work-in-progress model next to its reference image.

2016-09-18 20.46.31

The force is with you, young Skywalker, but you are not a Jedi yet.

LEGO builder Andrew JN, whose excellent death of Obi-Wan Kenobi we featured a year ago, brings us this great rendition of one of the most tense scenes in all of Star Wars: the chilling first meeting of Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader in The Empire Strikes Back. Andrew says he worked hard to balance the lighting, so that the model captures the dark, foreboding aura of the scene, while still highlighting his fantastic work with the bricks. The great design of the carbon-freezing chamber is worth noting, built with unevenly stacked plates to form a semicircle.

You are not a Jedi yet...

The most adorable LEGO Stitch and Pikachu you’ll ever see

It’s a talent to build a good LEGO model of a character so that it looks like its source, but it’s even harder to imbue chunks of hard plastic with cuteness and personality. LEGO builder delayice has given these Stitch and Pikachu sculptures an extra helping of adorableness, though. Can’t you just feel Stitch’s lovable but mischievous mind working behind that grin?


The fastest traffic cop in the city

Disney’s Zootopia was one of this year’s breakout successes, and officer Judy Hops, Zootopia’s first rabbit in uniform, carried audiences with her fast-paced charm. Here’s a fine LEGO version of Hops with her carrot-pen, built by Sheo. She’s even poseable, and pretty much the same scale as the awesome Nick Wilde we highlighted early this year.

Gothic magnificence in brick: the Library of Parliament in Ottawa, Canada

I’d never seen Canada’s Library of Parliament before encountering Erwin te Kortschot‘s beautiful LEGO version, and I was amazed by its stunning Victorian High Gothic architecture shaped as a round library. A better structure to hold an nation’s library could hardly be imagined, as the cumulative knowledge of a people ought to be enshrined in a building which inspires awe. Erwin’s brick-built version is just as lovely as the original, despite the difficult circular design.

Library of Parliament (front)

Library of Parliament (collage 2)

The Creation of Minifig-kind

We’ve always known that the LEGO minifigure is awesome, but who’d have guessed it was divinely created? Thanks to Ki Young Lee, who has reinterpreted into LEGO form Michelangelo’s painting The Creation of Adam, which graces the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, we can at last see how the minifigure came into existance.

The Creation of Adam

Fresh cracked crab is what’s for dinner

I love seafood, and crab in particular. Here in the Pacific Northwest, one of the best ways to have it is to get fresh dungeness crab and crack it yourself, so this typhoon shelter crab dish by LEGO 7, made with a fresh whole crab, feels right at home and makes me very hungry. The builder even includes some tools of the trade, useful for scavenging every last bit of tasty meat from the shell.

Typhoon Shelter Crab 避風塘炒蟹

Turning the cogs of industry, one ball at a time [Video]

Great Ball Contraptions are a mainstay of LEGO conventions, consisting of short sections of machinery which transport LEGO soccer balls from one side to another. Each builder’s machine can be connected to the next, to transport a dizzying number of balls around a display. Many builders focus on the all-important task of getting the fundamental mechanics working smoothly, but we’re seeing more and more builders take some time for the aesthetics as well. One such example is this enthralling contraption by chumuhou (楚沐猴), which has a fantastic steam-age industrial vibe. Check out the video to see it in action, too!

A good place to catch your breath — or have your breath catch

The dark primeval swamps of a fantasy world are always a place to be on your guard. They may be silent, too silent perhaps, but the heavy air laden with motes belies the danger of Tirrell Brown‘s bog. This great little vignette has some amazing fen flora made of classic LEGO bushes turned upside down and capped with 4×4 domes. The glowing Galaxy Squad alien eggs add to the mystery and otherworldliness of this everglade.

Back Into the Swamps