About Jonathan

LEGO was always Jonathan's favourite toy growing up in Middle Zealand, until around the age of 16 when he was told he was too old for toys. 16 years of Dark Ages later he decided you are never too old for toys and became hooked again with 7477 T-1 Typhoon vs. T-Rex and has since amassed over a hundred thousand bricks to facilitate his MOC building obsession. Jonathan runs a small IT business from home with his wife and three young boys under 5 (who are allowed to play with Daddy's LEGO when they can learn to stop putting it in their mouths!). When not working or spending time with family Jonathan is usually sorting LEGO.

Posts by Jonathan

I’m not locked in here with you, you’re locked in here with me!

If you haven’t heard of Watchmen by Alan Moore, artist Dave Gibbons, and colorist John Higgins, find yourself a copy of the comic or watch the 2009 movie by director Zac Snyder. Inspired by a favorite comic book (Rorschach’s Journal. October 12th, 1985), Brick Brickolson has captured the shifting ink blots of Walter Kovacs’ alter ego. I love that Brick has included the Comedian’s smiley badge complete with the smear of blood in the lower left corner. A fantastic replication of one of the world’s most polarised anti-heroes.

Watchmen #1: Rorschach

There’s life on Mars after all

If Arsia Prime looks as good in real life as it does in the pictures, sign me up! Just like The Martian, everything about this off-world arboretum is fantastically realistic. The terrain is gorgeous, offering a stunning variety of layering, subtly blended colors, and unique rock formations. Builder Ryan Howerter describes this simply as “a relatively near-future colony on Mars.” With the daily advances of space travel, these words may not be too far from the truth.

Arsia Prime

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I saved the world again today. It was off the chain.

Black & white. All important photos are taken in black & white. And atmosphere. Edgy, rainy atmosphere that would make small children and adults nervous. And lighting. Really subtle and aesthetically pleasing lighting.

This portrait of Bruce Wayne by legomeee would certainly get LEGO Batman’s brooding stamp of approval for appropriate tone. I’m not sure what he is looking at, but that umbrella is macho. I dig it.

Bruce Wayne👍

Now, get yourself ready, for some inspiration. If you want to make the world a better place, Take a look at yourself and make a change. Hooo! –  Batman.

Give me a home where the tiny buffalo roam

Isn’t it marvellous what builders are able to come up with using literally handfuls of LEGO bricks? We’ve featured Grantmasters microscale slight of hand before. Looking at this elegant build, it’s possible to imagine fields of these thirsty beasts thundering the Great Plains in vast numbers. I’ll leave you with these inspirational words from a Buffalo: Stand your ground. Have a tough hide. Keep moving on. Cherish wide open spaces. Have a strong spirit. Roam wild and free. Let the chips fall where they may!

Buffalo

Transformer assembly line

You may remember Alex Jones‘ amazing LEGO Transformers that we featured in action recently. Now Alex has teamed up with builder Joachim Klang to create a book called Tips for Kids: Transformers: Cool Projects for your LEGO Bricks. In this preview for the book, which is scheduled for release in July, we see a Medi-bot repairing one of the Autobots with help from Teletraan I, the semi-sentient computer that runs the Autobots’ spaceship and base of operations, the Ark.

TELETRAAN I

Much like his other builds, the attention to detail here is magnificent. A fantastic creation enhanced with creative lighting and a little Photoshop editing around that pink holobrick. All these ingredients help to bring the robots in disguise to life in LEGO form. If you want to see more of these wonderful images, good news: the book will have over 200 pages, and is available for pre-order right now.

Let’s light this candle

Master of the mechanized build Jason Allemann does it again, this time taking the new LEGO Ideas set 21309 NASA Apollo Saturn V and incorporating lights and sounds using the PFx Brick, as well giving it a custom launch pad.

Jason’s other ingenious creations include an ever-toiling sculpture of Sisyphus, and the LEGO Ideas set 21305 Maze, which we interviewed him about last year.

Please excuse the mess – kids are making memories

Did you ever design your own “dream room” when your were a child? I did, and it looked something like this boy’s room by John Snyder. Built for the final round of the ABS builder challenge and largely inspired by César Soares‘ amazing kid’s room, John says of his latest creation “it was really enjoyable to build a modern interior for a change, something outside of minifigure scale”. The scene is stocked to the gills with toys including (but not limited to) LEGO, action figures, costumes, planes, trains and even a castle! The stand out features for me are the working bi-fold door, fish tank, and brilliant red telescope.

Boy's Room

He’s a man from outer space and we’re taking him to his spaceship.

E.T. was one of the first movies I ever saw as a kid. Steven Speilberg’s classic 1982 movie was an immediate blockbuster, surpassing Star Wars to become the highest-grossing film of all time—a record it held for eleven years until Jurassic ParkJon & Catherine Stead have captured the animatronic Extra Terrestrial’s departure from our planet as Elliot, Michael, Gertie and Harvey (the family Labrador retriever) bid farewell at the doors of his spaceship.

"I'll be right here..." E.T. Lego MOC - 1

The model is constructed on a 68 x 68 stud base. The nine-engine spaceship weighs about 1.45 kg, and stands 45 cm high with a diameter of 30 cm. The main spaceship structure was based on a 24-stud diameter SNOT sphere. The builders point out that the landing feet were a big challenge to build in a manner that would bear the large mass of the spaceship.

"I'll be right here..." E.T. Lego MOC - 19

After pointing to his heart and saying “I’ll be right here,” E.T. leaves Elliott as the theater erupted into tears of sadness mixed with joy—a poignant depiction of one of the most famous scenes in movie history.

Moana’s pet rooster Hei Hei struts his stuff

If you haven’t seen Disney’s charming Moana, you may not recognize Hei Hei, the Pacific Island princess’s dim-witted and comical but seaworthy companion. I love how LEGO 7 has captured the quizzical head tilt of the foolhardy rooster. The colorful design staged against the pale blue looks exquisite. Take note of the minifig flippers for the plucky poultry’s wattle and the dark green round corner elements as tender chicken wings, although I am sure Maui would probably still say he needs fattening up.

Hei Hei the Rooster

This piece of junk made the Kessel Run in less than twelve parsecs

Happy 40th anniversary, Star Wars! Sad Brick has created this wonderful microscale Millenium Falcon to help us celebrate. Despite being made out of only two or three bricks each, our much-loved heroes are instantly recognizable – and I just love the cupcake top for Chewie’s head! The scene is packed full of skillful little details, like the piping on the back wall, the sideways use of tan arch elements, and LEGO shooters used for the seam of the landing bay doors. The Corellian freighter itself is a fantastic representation of the most beloved ship in the galaxy. The guns, the dish, and the cockpit all look perfect and that subtle coil of LEGO string charging the Falcon is a masterstroke.

Millennium Falcon

Miniature Medieval Marvel

It never ceases to amaze me how builders like Simon NH invent ingenious uses for unique LEGO elements. Spy the new pyramid piece cresting a pair of Thor’s Hammers as the half-toothed Technic bush crowns the crenels of the tallest towers. Did you notice the minifig arms as the rocky foundation or how Simon has used a broom as the little wooden bridge? The two swords as the path and the rippling surface of the water both also look brilliant. My favorite part usage has to be the new ‘tooth’ piece as the stone entranceway to this inspired little build.

Rushwater Fortress

Like a dragonfly skimming the surface of the water, touch on something without going into it deeply

Ever since I was a kid, I’ve been fascinated with creepy crawlies, but dragonflies were always a favorite. I love how they’d appear to defy gravity as they hovered above the rippling water. Takamichi Irie has recreated this iconic insect with a ‘handful’ of minifig parts (note all the minifigure hands used as connectors on the wings), some flex tube and a sprinkling of blue and black elements. With some sharp photography and clever use of lighting, it even appears to be hovering; all that is missing is the water.

Dragonfly