Yearly Archives: 2017

Party girls don’t get hurt

As the craze for building custom Brickheadz continues to work its way inexorably through every corner of popular culture, a few gems are popping up. Here Johnnie “Brick” Xavier has recreated young dancer Maddie Ziegler as she appeared in the 2014 music video for Sia’s breakout hit Chandelier.

The unconventional style of the Australian singer required an unconventional video, and this visceral performance by then the 11-year old Zielger delivered: 1.5 billion views later it is now one of YouTube’s most watched videos. While sticking to the Brickheadz pattern, Johnnie’s LEGO rendition is immediately recognizable, helped by the addition of a prop and pose lifted perfectly from the video itself. All that’s missing is a Brickheadz version of Sia herself – her back turned toward us, naturally.

I build, therefore I am

Petr Guz reconsiders his life of an adult fan of LEGO in the most creative way — through a brilliant diorama full of philosophical context. Describing his work, the builder focuses attention on three peculiar pictures on the walls behind his self-portrait. Each picture depicts his life as it could have looked if he hadn’t picked up LEGO as a hobby years ago. Of course, Petr clarifies his life now isn’t deprived of sports, traveling or programming, yet it’s so hard for him to imagine it complete without his favorite pastime.

Who would I be without LEGO?

My favorite part of the build is a couple of creations lying around. A micro-castle on the top of the drawer is Petr’s citadel from last September, while a huge white moth on the table to the right of the figure was featured here just a couple of weeks ago.

There’s nothing like that in the fossil record

This scene by Didier Burtin reminds me of the hit 1990 monster movie Tremors starting Kevin Bacon. It features a worm-like monster of unknown origin that terrifies folks in a desert town. It slithers underground and feels the vibrations on the surface to detect – and then rise to devour – its next victim. So, if there’s no fossil history of these gargantuan man-eating snakes, I can only deduce they must be of an alien origin.
Worm attack

Worm attack (detail)

Don’t play the saxophone – let it play you

A little photo editing has been used to great effect in this bustling scene by legomeee, making the saxophonist stand out against the washed out surroundings. It creates the feeling that the busker is bringing vibrancy and color to an otherwise drab and dour market scene. The builder has chosen the perfect expression for the musician’s face as he plays his sax, and the motion blur of the people in the foreground helps complete the illusion of a lively flea market.

Flea market😄

Invasion of the BB-8’s

Out with the Brickheadz and in with the BB-8’s? Apparently everything can be BB-8-ified, from other Star Wars characters, to DC or Marvel superheroes, and even the Sanrio franchise! I’m impressed by the way Handoko Setyawan has taken a simple spherical shape, and with clever interchange of colors and perhaps a distinguishing feature or two, transformed it into a range of familiar characters.

bb8s

Two of my favourite spherical charms are those spikes of Darth Maul and Hello Kitty’s ribbon bow. Check out his Flickr album for a closer look at the rest of this ball-tastic invasion! And if you think you’re up to creating your own BB-8 inspired build, Handoko’s even provided an instruction guide to help you build one.

Click here to see closeups

It’s a dog’s life with Droopy

Today we have not one, but two versions of the cartoon character Droopy created by American animator Frederick Bean “Tex” Avery.  Droopy was created in 1943 during the Golden Age of American Animation, and was known for being a rather lethargic, slow character with a monotone voice and deadpan humour. The first LEGO version of this character is by Jimmy Fortel. With those hanging jowls, drooping eyelids, and characteristic paunch, there’s no doubt about the name of this dog.

Droopy

74louloute has not just stopped at Droopy, but included LEGO versions of the Wolf and the Red Hot Riding Hood. This second build is a smaller-scale version of Droopy, with good use of the droopy eye 2×2 tile and some nice shaping around the muzzle. I had to smile at Wolf’s classic ‘eye on stalks’ pose when he spots Red Hot Riding Hood — those red helmets are certainly protecting her assets!

Droopy & The Wolf

The Ministry’s Floo Network makes commuting easy for Arthur Weasley

There’s nothing great about morning commutes, but they might a bit more tolerable if you have access to the Floo Network, like Ron Weasley’s father, Arthur. He uses it daily to commute to the Ministry, and this fantastic LEGO vignette of Arthur stepping out of the Network by Eero Okkonen is perfect.

Arthur Weasley arrives to his workplace in Ministry of Magic via Floo Network

The green flames licking Arthur’s legs are actually Duplo grass elements, a piece we’ve been seeing a lot of lately, as it’s the mandatory element in the latest round of Iron Builder. Yesterday we featured a lovely sitting room using the element, and we’ve previously seen it as a flying carpet, a hut’s roof, a cyborg dinosaur, and a very clever medical device.

Relaxing in the green room

OK, so this LEGO green room may not be the waiting area for celebrities, but chances are it’s also a lot homier. This modest den accentuated with emerald tapestries is yet another of Jonas Kramm‘s fantastic uses for the Duplo grass element. Look closely, and you’ll spy the unwieldy element in two distinct applications, but don’t miss all the other wonderful details while you’re searching, from the bearskin rug to the agave plant made of alligator tails.

Green Lounge

Jonas built this lovely den for the Iron Builder contest, where he continues to make excellent work of the Duplo seed element, having previously used it as a flying carpet and the roof of whimsical huts.

Smashing LEGO like a Rock Star: a conversation with Canadian Iron Builder, Tim Schwalfenberg [Interview]

This week we headed up to our great neighbor to the north to track down Tim Schwalfenberg. Tim lives in Canada, is 21 years old and is currently studying Materials Engineering at his local university. He also likes to publicly smash his LEGO builds too, but more about that later.

TimSchwalfenberg

TBB: Hi Tim! Can you tell us a little about yourself and your relationship with the Brick?

Tim: Sure! I have found LEGO to be a great creative outlet when I need a break from all my calculus or physics courses. While I’ve been building almost as long as I can remember, it wasn’t until my first year of university that I started to look at LEGO with the intention of making anything beyond the rainbow-warrior spaceships of my earlier years. Through a combination of some inspiring creations I stumbled upon through MOCpages and finding myself with too much free time on my hands, I decided that to try out this LEGO thing more seriously. Thousands of pieces and hundreds of creations later the LEGO hobby has become an incredibly important part of my life. The itch to build has become a constant companion that is easily rewarded by long hours tinkering away on a table-scrap covered table.

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Bat-rules are made to be broken

We all know Batman only builds in black, and sometimes in very, very dark grey. But it seems like he’s made an exception to his rule, and it turned out pretty sweet. We have to thank Lucas for giving the Batmobile from Dawn of Justice a new shade — even if the light grey sees it remains at the darker end of the spectrum. A little something special for Comish Gordon too — a redesigned Bat-Signal in the same hue.

A Darker Knight

Life is like a box of chocolates

Remember that feeling when you open a brand new box of fresh chocolates and you can’t decide which one to try first? That was exactly my first impression when I came across John Snyder‘s box of LEGO sweets. Glossy tiles and dishes are coupled with thick white rubber bands, and the results really look like actual chocolate — from milk chocolate (in tan) through to rich dark bitter morsels (in dark brown). And best of all, the model has fabulous presentation — capturing the box on a dinner table with some sweets in a glass bowl.

Sumptuous Sweets